Daily Listening Assignments ~ June 28, 2020

 

Korobeiniki is a nineteenth-century Russian folk song that tells the story of a meeting between a peddler and a girl, describing their haggling over goods in a veiled metaphor for courtship.

Outside Russia, “Korobeiniki” is widely known as the Tetris theme.

 

Piano duet:

 

Orchestral version:

 

For Boomwhackers:

Vocal:

 

Ragtime:

 

Balalaika:

 

Two bassoons:

The Red Army Choir:

Korobeiniki/Tetris is available in Piano Maestro on the iPad and I have several levels of sheet music for anyone who is interested.

Enjoy!

June 28, 2019 ~ Daily Listening Assignment

 

Korobeiniki is a nineteenth-century Russian folk song that tells the story of a meeting between a peddler and a girl, describing their haggling over goods in a veiled metaphor for courtship.

Outside Russia, “Korobeiniki” is widely known as the Tetris theme.

 

Piano duet:

 

Orchestral version:

 

For Boomwhackers:

Vocal:

 

Ragtime:

 

Balalaika:

 

Two bassoons:

The Red Army Choir:

Korobeiniki/Tetris is available in Piano Maestro on the iPad and I have several levels of sheet music for anyone who is interested.

Enjoy!

June 29 ~ Daily Listening Assignment

 

Korobeiniki is a nineteenth-century Russian folk song that tells the story of a meeting between a peddler and a girl, describing their haggling over goods in a veiled metaphor for courtship.

Outside Russia, “Korobeiniki” is widely known as the Tetris theme.

 

Orchestral version:

 

For Boomwhackers:

Vocal:

 

Ragtime:

 

Balalaika:

 

The Red Army Choir:

Korobeiniki/Tetris is available in Piano Maestro on the iPad and I have the sheet music for anyone who is interested.

Enjoy!

Classical Music and Children

classical-music

All children should be compelled to learn about classical music in the same way they must do maths and science, Nicola Benedetti has argued.

Benedetti, the award-winning violinist, said all youngsters should be exposed to classical music, whether they like it or not.

Saying the concept of letting children do exactly what they want in other areas of education is “alien”, she admitted she is “bemused” by the current approach to teaching art and culture.

“It actually really upsets me when people say: ‘Kids hate listening to a symphony, why would we do that to them?’” she said, in an interview with Scotland on Sunday.

“I think, hang on a minute, if you were to turn round and say to a kids: ‘Would you like to play video games or would you like to have a maths lesson?’ Of course, they’re going to go for the video games.”

Benedetti is involved with the Sistema Scotland music education and its Big Noise Orchestra.

She added: “Needing the child’s approval for what they do in school is just such an alien concept when you’re talking about maths, science, history or English.

“But, suddenly, when you bring music into the mix, it’s: ‘Oh no, we can’t show them anything that they don’t instantly love because that would be like forcing children into something that they don’t want to do.’

“It just bemuses me.”

Read more at Expose children to classical music whether they like it or not, says Nicola Benedetti – Telegraph.

Piano lessons possibly on the decline

piano-teacher

Growing up, many people remember taking piano lessons, or having several friends who learned the instrument.

But as generations change, some hobbies evolve too…

When it comes to the amount of people learning to play the piano, is it really on the decline?

“I don’t think you see it quite as much today just because there’s so much more distraction nowadays,” Steve Buckman, a piano instructor at Vancil Performing Arts Center said.

Buckman says when it comes to taking lessons it’s very different than 50 years ago.

He says between video games, social media, and other hobbies, the piano can sometimes take a back seat when it comes deciding what to spend your free time on.

Another factor is something that typically has a large weight in our decision making…money.

Read more at Piano lessons possibly on the decline : News : ConnectTriStates.com.

Expose children to classical music whether they like it or not, says Nicola Benedetti

classical-music

All children should be compelled to learn about classical music in the same way they must do maths and science, Nicola Benedetti has argued.

Benedetti, the award-winning violinist, said all youngsters should be exposed to classical music, whether they like it or not.

Saying the concept of letting children do exactly what they want in other areas of education is “alien”, she admitted she is “bemused” by the current approach to teaching art and culture.

“It actually really upsets me when people say: ‘Kids hate listening to a symphony, why would we do that to them?’” she said, in an interview with Scotland on Sunday.

“I think, hang on a minute, if you were to turn round and say to a kids: ‘Would you like to play video games or would you like to have a maths lesson?’ Of course, they’re going to go for the video games.”

Benedetti is involved with the Sistema Scotland music education and its Big Noise Orchestra.

She added: “Needing the child’s approval for what they do in school is just such an alien concept when you’re talking about maths, science, history or English.

“But, suddenly, when you bring music into the mix, it’s: ‘Oh no, we can’t show them anything that they don’t instantly love because that would be like forcing children into something that they don’t want to do.’

“It just bemuses me.”

Read more at Expose children to classical music whether they like it or not, says Nicola Benedetti – Telegraph.