Space calls tune for longest piano | Stuff.co.nz

Wanted: Temporary space for the world’s largest piano. Must have flat access, as requires forklift.

A piano handcrafted in a garage near Timaru, weighing in at 1.4 tonnes and with a length of 5.7 metres, is rolling through Wellington next month and its maker is hunting for a place to show it off.

It took Adrian Mann, 25, four years to build the piano, and he has spent the past few years giving people around New Zealand a chance to play it – he even tried, unsuccessfully, to get Elton John to give it a tinkle.

It all started when, as a curious 15-year-old, he wanted to see how long a piece of piano wire would be if it were not wrapped in copper.

 

Read the entire article at Space calls tune for longest piano | Stuff.co.nz.

Piano Maestro A Parent’s Guide

Piano Mania

 

It will be fun watching your child improve their piano skills all while having fun using Piano Maestro in lessons each week!

As your child’s teacher (or YOUR teacher!), I’m looking forward to seeing the progress they will make when they start using it at home each day. This guide will help you understand how this app will benefit your child and how to get it set up on your own iPad.

 

Overview
What is Piano Maestro?

Piano Maestro is the ultimate piano practice tool that will have students quickly playing their favorite classical, pop, rock, TV and video game songs and themes. It is available in the App Store and works on the iPad.

 

What skills does it improve?
• Note reading
• Sight reading
• Rhythm
• Inner pulse
• Confidence

 

What makes it so fun?
• Upbeat background tracks
• Stunning graphics
• Instant rewards and feed back
• Satisfaction of playing REAL music

 

It works with an acoustic piano?

Yes! Your child practices on your real acoustic or digital piano. Piano Maestro listens from the iPad’s built in microphone. No wires needed.

 

I’m already paying for lessons and books. What value does this add?

Sometimes I wish I could be there with your child to encourage them to keep practicing daily. I’m sure it’s not always easy, as unforeseen challenges will arise.

Since our time each week is just too short, this app will give me eyes on the ground and it will keep them practicing longer and improving more quickly.

 

How will it be used in lessons?

I will spend a few minutes of each lesson helping your child master a couple of new songs all while having fun! I will also teach them how to use the practice options at home.

At the end of the lesson, we will choose Home Challenge assignments within the app that will show up in your account at home. I’ll get updates when progress is made.

 

Getting Started
Wow, this sounds awesome. Now, how do I get started?

1) Download Piano Maestro on your iPad from the AppStore
2) Create a JoyTunes account with a parent’s email, under which, you can have multiple profiles for each member of the family.
3) Create a profile for each family member (that means you too Mom and Dad!) inside the Parent/Teacher zone (top right hand corner of main screen)
4) Connect to your teacher, me! After creating a profile in the “profiles” tab of the parent/teacher zone, select the student’s profile and click “connect to teacher.” Once I approve connection to your child, they will receive full access to all content for FREE! I will then also begin receiving weekly progress reports.
5) Start Playing – I will now start assigning you homework, meanwhile get started on Journey Mode.

 

There is one change in the video below – when you connect to the O’Connor Music Studio, Piano Maestro is free forever.

Get Them Started Early!

piano-gym

Baby kicks. Music plays. And that’s just the beginning. Movable toys on the overhead gym encourage baby to bat and grasp. Move the arch down for tummy-time play, or let baby sit and entertain you with a piano concert! And now with a removable piano, you can take the musical fun wherever you and baby go!

 

Features
  • Four ways to play: Lay & play; Tummy time; Sit & play; Take-along
  • Music rewards baby as she kicks the piano keys
  • Five busy activity toys & a large mirror
  • Toys include a hippo teether, elephant clackers, rollerball frog, and more
  • Short or long-play music—up to 15 minutes
  • Soft, comfy mat
  • Power/volume control
  • Requires 3 AA batteries

Toys overhead encourage batting and grasping, including a hippo teether, elephant clackers, rollerball frog and more!

Stretching & kicking

With four ways to play, this musical toy grows with your little one! From laying and playing, to tummy time and sitting up, busy activities at each stage are just the beginning of the fun. Baby’s in charge of the action as her little kicky feet activate music. Moveable toys overhead encourage batting and grasping, including a hippo teether, elephant clackers, rollerball frog and more.

When it’s time to change modes, move the arch down for tummy time or let baby sit up and entertain you with a piano concert. Remove the piano and take the fun on-the-go. Includes long and short play modes with up to 15 minutes of music. Power and volume control for quiet play.

Removable piano provides musical fun wherever you and baby go!

Learning through play!

As baby plays, new discoveries are made and key developmental skills get stronger and stronger. As baby stretches and kicks at the piano keys or bats at and reaches for the busy activity toys, gross motor skills are enhanced. Music, lights and bright colors stimulate baby’s senses.

Help baby learn the connection between actions and reactions. Put baby’s foot within reach of the piano. From there, it’s bound to happen: baby’s foot will connect and activate a fun and rewarding response from the gym!

Ludwig Van Beethoven Piano Trios Opus 70 No. 2, Opus 97 “Archduke” | World Music Report

beethoven

Beethoven’s first published works—his Opus No.1—were three trios for piano, violin and cello and already they show a marked advance on Haydn’s trios in the comparative interdependence of the three parts. Their freedom from Haydn’s oppressive formality looks forward to the first mature trios, the pair that comprises Opus 70, displaying all sorts of harmonic twists, thematic innovations and structural idiosyncrasies, these trios make much of the piano part and contain plenty of dramatic outbursts that are typical of Beethoven’s middle period.

Even more arresting is the first of the Opus 70 trios (1808) nicknamed ”The Ghost” because of its mysterious and haunting Largo. Its sibling boasts a cheerful bombastic finale that is the most entertaining music that Beethoven composed for this combination of instruments.

The “Archduke” Trio Opus 97 (1811) was Beethoven’s last full – scale work for piano trio and is typically conclusive. The third movement is its centre of gravity, a highly moving set of variations with the cello dominating the thematic content. It opens with a hymn-like theme and progresses to a coda which magnificently sums up the movements ideas. The finale might be less powerful than that of Opus 70 No. 2, but it nevertheless has a sweeping rhythmic power. Again, it is beyond the shadow of a doubt that Beethoven defined the piano trio form that it retained throughout the 19th century by allowing the string instruments the status of genuinely equal partners in this superlative performance.

 

Read more at Ludwig Van Beethoven Piano Trios Opus 70 No. 2, Opus 97 “Archduke” | World Music Report.

It’s Never Too Late!

“I used to play piano, when I was a child,” Fitzgerald explained. “My mother liked it, because she could just say, ‘Go play piano!’ and I’d go off and play it by myself.”

Fitzgerald stopped playing when she was young, due to the large size of her family. None of her brothers or sisters were much interested in the instrument, and she began to feel uncomfortable about her hobby.

She explained that big families can’t afford everything, and that keeping an expensive object like a piano for just one person would have been selfish.

So Fitzgerald gave up her piano, grew up, and moved on. But she always remembered her love of the piano. And when she moved into the Cartmell Home, and found out about the lessons, she was hooked.

“I decided to give it a try,” she said, laughing, “I’ve already got one foot in the grave! When else will I get the chance to?”

Although Fitzgerald’s skill with the instrument has atrophied since she was younger, (she laughs while pointing out that her music practice book is designed for children) her innate talents are as sharp as ever.

“I’ve always had an ear for music” she explains, “I can play a tune just from hearing it.”

Read the entire article at Returning to the keys: retired techer takes piano lessons after decades.

In D.C., a 13-year-old piano prodigy is treated as a truant instead of a star student – The Washington Post

From Today’s Washington Post:

Avery Gagliano is a commanding young pianist who attacks Chopin with the focused diligence of a master craftsman and the grace of a ballet dancer.

The prodigy, who just turned 13, was one of 12 musicians selected from across the globe to play at a prestigious event in Munich last year and has won competitions and headlined with orchestras nationwide.

But to the D.C. public school system, the eighth-grader from Mount Pleasant is also a truant. Yes, you read that right. Avery’s amazing talent and straight-A grades at Alice Deal Middle School earned her no slack from school officials, despite her parents’ begging and pleading for an exception.

http://youtu.be/VC28vsf9cuY

Read more at In D.C., a 13-year-old piano prodigy is treated as a truant instead of a star student – The Washington Post.