Is Your Tune Piano in Tune?

piano-tuning

 

When it comes to tuning, every piano is different, even two pianos of the same style and make are different, and the humidity of the room makes a big difference, he said.

High humidity causes the sound board to swell, stretching the strings and causing the pitch to go sharp, while low humidity has the opposite effect.

In Minnesota, humidity can easily range from 80 percent in the summertime to 10-15 percent in the winter, if the home doesn’t have a humidifier. Wood-heated homes tend to be especially dry, he said.

“Pianos like it between 40 and 50 percent humidity in the house,” he said.

Even places that are supposedly “climate-controlled,” aren’t always. The heat might get turned down substantially evenings and weekends, for example.

A new piano needs a few weeks to settle into its new home before tuning, Fry said.

“If they get a new piano, generally they call us the day before it gets in the house,” he said. “It should sit in the house a couple weeks just to acclimatize it to its new surroundings … brand new pianos stretch for a while. They go out of tune quicker. The wire stretches and they settle into themselves.”

Some people think they have to let a new, or recently moved older piano, sit six months or a year before it gets tuned. That’s not true, Fry said, but it does need a few weeks.

He recommends that pianos be tuned at least once a year (he tunes his own piano once a year, even though he no longer gives lessons) and the busiest time for him is before the holidays — September through December.

“Piano-tuning is something people can put off,” he said. “We noticed a real drop in tuning when gas got over $3 a gallon. I didn’t think it would make that much of a difference, but it did.”

Fry said he is looking for some kind of work to do in the summertime when his other businesses are slow.

He doesn’t give piano or guitar lessons anymore, but does enjoy tuning all types of pianos.

“It takes me a couple of hours. I have time,” Fry said. “I’m going to do the job that I like to do, and do it right.”

Read the entire article at Keeping pianos, life in tune | Detroit Lakes Online.

Is It Time to Tune Your Piano?

piano-tuning

 

When it comes to tuning, every piano is different, even two pianos of the same style and make are different, and the humidity of the room makes a big difference, he said.

High humidity causes the sound board to swell, stretching the strings and causing the pitch to go sharp, while low humidity has the opposite effect.

In Minnesota, humidity can easily range from 80 percent in the summertime to 10-15 percent in the winter, if the home doesn’t have a humidifier. Wood-heated homes tend to be especially dry, he said.

“Pianos like it between 40 and 50 percent humidity in the house,” he said.

Even places that are supposedly “climate-controlled,” aren’t always. The heat might get turned down substantially evenings and weekends, for example.

A new piano needs a few weeks to settle into its new home before tuning, Fry said.

“If they get a new piano, generally they call us the day before it gets in the house,” he said. “It should sit in the house a couple weeks just to acclimatize it to its new surroundings … brand new pianos stretch for a while. They go out of tune quicker. The wire stretches and they settle into themselves.”

Some people think they have to let a new, or recently moved older piano, sit six months or a year before it gets tuned. That’s not true, Fry said, but it does need a few weeks.

He recommends that pianos be tuned at least once a year (he tunes his own piano once a year, even though he no longer gives lessons) and the busiest time for him is before the holidays — September through December.

“Piano-tuning is something people can put off,” he said. “We noticed a real drop in tuning when gas got over $3 a gallon. I didn’t think it would make that much of a difference, but it did.”

Fry said he is looking for some kind of work to do in the summertime when his other businesses are slow.

He doesn’t give piano or guitar lessons anymore, but does enjoy tuning all types of pianos.

“It takes me a couple of hours. I have time,” Fry said. “I’m going to do the job that I like to do, and do it right.”

Read the entire article at Keeping pianos, life in tune | Detroit Lakes Online.

Is Your Piano in Tune?

piano-tuning

 

When it comes to tuning, every piano is different, even two pianos of the same style and make are different, and the humidity of the room makes a big difference, he said.

High humidity causes the sound board to swell, stretching the strings and causing the pitch to go sharp, while low humidity has the opposite effect.

In Minnesota, humidity can easily range from 80 percent in the summertime to 10-15 percent in the winter, if the home doesn’t have a humidifier. Wood-heated homes tend to be especially dry, he said.

“Pianos like it between 40 and 50 percent humidity in the house,” he said.

Even places that are supposedly “climate-controlled,” aren’t always. The heat might get turned down substantially evenings and weekends, for example.

A new piano needs a few weeks to settle into its new home before tuning, Fry said.

“If they get a new piano, generally they call us the day before it gets in the house,” he said. “It should sit in the house a couple weeks just to acclimatize it to its new surroundings … brand new pianos stretch for a while. They go out of tune quicker. The wire stretches and they settle into themselves.”

Some people think they have to let a new, or recently moved older piano, sit six months or a year before it gets tuned. That’s not true, Fry said, but it does need a few weeks.

He recommends that pianos be tuned at least once a year (he tunes his own piano once a year, even though he no longer gives lessons) and the busiest time for him is before the holidays — September through December.

“Piano-tuning is something people can put off,” he said. “We noticed a real drop in tuning when gas got over $3 a gallon. I didn’t think it would make that much of a difference, but it did.”

Fry said he is looking for some kind of work to do in the summertime when his other businesses are slow.

He doesn’t give piano or guitar lessons anymore, but does enjoy tuning all types of pianos.

“It takes me a couple of hours. I have time,” Fry said. “I’m going to do the job that I like to do, and do it right.”

Read the entire article at Keeping pianos, life in tune | Detroit Lakes Online.

Keep Your Piano in Tune

piano-tuning

When it comes to tuning, every piano is different, even two pianos of the same style and make are different, and the humidity of the room makes a big difference, he said.

High humidity causes the sound board to swell, stretching the strings and causing the pitch to go sharp, while low humidity has the opposite effect.

In Minnesota, humidity can easily range from 80 percent in the summertime to 10-15 percent in the winter, if the home doesn’t have a humidifier. Wood-heated homes tend to be especially dry, he said.

“Pianos like it between 40 and 50 percent humidity in the house,” he said.

Even places that are supposedly “climate-controlled,” aren’t always. The heat might get turned down substantially evenings and weekends, for example.

A new piano needs a few weeks to settle into its new home before tuning, Fry said.

“If they get a new piano, generally they call us the day before it gets in the house,” he said. “It should sit in the house a couple weeks just to acclimatize it to its new surroundings … brand new pianos stretch for a while. They go out of tune quicker. The wire stretches and they settle into themselves.”

Some people think they have to let a new, or recently moved older piano, sit six months or a year before it gets tuned. That’s not true, Fry said, but it does need a few weeks.

He recommends that pianos be tuned at least once a year (he tunes his own piano once a year, even though he no longer gives lessons) and the busiest time for him is before the holidays — September through December.

“Piano-tuning is something people can put off,” he said. “We noticed a real drop in tuning when gas got over $3 a gallon. I didn’t think it would make that much of a difference, but it did.”

Fry said he is looking for some kind of work to do in the summertime when his other businesses are slow.

He doesn’t give piano or guitar lessons anymore, but does enjoy tuning all types of pianos.

“It takes me a couple of hours. I have time,” Fry said. “I’m going to do the job that I like to do, and do it right.”

Read the entire article at Keeping pianos, life in tune | Detroit Lakes Online.

Keeping Your Piano in Tune

piano-tuning

 

When it comes to tuning, every piano is different, even two pianos of the same style and make are different, and the humidity of the room makes a big difference, he said.

High humidity causes the sound board to swell, stretching the strings and causing the pitch to go sharp, while low humidity has the opposite effect.

In Minnesota, humidity can easily range from 80 percent in the summertime to 10-15 percent in the winter, if the home doesn’t have a humidifier. Wood-heated homes tend to be especially dry, he said.

“Pianos like it between 40 and 50 percent humidity in the house,” he said.

Even places that are supposedly “climate-controlled,” aren’t always. The heat might get turned down substantially evenings and weekends, for example.

A new piano needs a few weeks to settle into its new home before tuning, Fry said.

“If they get a new piano, generally they call us the day before it gets in the house,” he said. “It should sit in the house a couple weeks just to acclimatize it to its new surroundings … brand new pianos stretch for a while. They go out of tune quicker. The wire stretches and they settle into themselves.”

Some people think they have to let a new, or recently moved older piano, sit six months or a year before it gets tuned. That’s not true, Fry said, but it does need a few weeks.

He recommends that pianos be tuned at least once a year (he tunes his own piano once a year, even though he no longer gives lessons) and the busiest time for him is before the holidays — September through December.

“Piano-tuning is something people can put off,” he said. “We noticed a real drop in tuning when gas got over $3 a gallon. I didn’t think it would make that much of a difference, but it did.”

Fry said he is looking for some kind of work to do in the summertime when his other businesses are slow.

He doesn’t give piano or guitar lessons anymore, but does enjoy tuning all types of pianos.

“It takes me a couple of hours. I have time,” Fry said. “I’m going to do the job that I like to do, and do it right.”

Read the entire article at Keeping pianos, life in tune | Detroit Lakes Online.

Need a Piano?

showroom284

 

 

If you want to adopt a piano, here’s a site that lists free pianos!

Please be aware that a piano, new or old, will need to be tuned after it is moved into your home.  There will also be moving costs.  Most movers charge extra if you need to move a piano up stairs – and they may charge by the number of stairs.

Don’t let this happen:

A good book on the subject of getting a piano, either new or used is The Piano Book by Larry Fine

pianobook

Western Springs Man Still Keeps Things In Tune

Gibbons said most people have their pianos tuned about once a year.

“It varies,” he said. “I did some every couple of weeks for a while at a club in Chicago, and I’ve gone to tune for people who haven’t had their pianos tuned in 10 years. The quality of pianos has increased considerably over the past 10 to 20 years.”

Gibbons said tuning is affected by seasonal changes.

“The temperature outside affects the environment inside,” he said. “It’s really the humidity that has the biggest impact on the tuning. How often you play really doesn’t have much of an impact on the tuning, although it can matter if you’re really banging things out over a period.”

As is the case with many things, technology has resulted in the biggest changes over the years in piano tuning.

“It’s still basically the same process, but there are some electronics that are relatively new,” he said. “They haven’t replaced the tuning fork; they have supplemented the tuning fork.”

Gibbons even has a couple of apps on his cellphone that are designed specifically to aid in the tuning of pianos.

“A good technician has to be conscientious and can’t be in a hurry,” he said. “Good customer relations is very important, too.”

Gibbons must be doing something right, as he has had some clients for several years.

via Western Springs man still keeps things in tune – The Doings Western Springs.

Keeping pianos, life in tune | Detroit Lakes Online

piano-tuning

When it comes to tuning, every piano is different, even two pianos of the same style and make are different, and the humidity of the room makes a big difference, he said.

High humidity causes the sound board to swell, stretching the strings and causing the pitch to go sharp, while low humidity has the opposite effect.

In Minnesota, humidity can easily range from 80 percent in the summertime to 10-15 percent in the winter, if the home doesn’t have a humidifier. Wood-heated homes tend to be especially dry, he said.

“Pianos like it between 40 and 50 percent humidity in the house,” he said.

Even places that are supposedly “climate-controlled,” aren’t always. The heat might get turned down substantially evenings and weekends, for example.

A new piano needs a few weeks to settle into its new home before tuning, Fry said.

“If they get a new piano, generally they call us the day before it gets in the house,” he said. “It should sit in the house a couple weeks just to acclimatize it to its new surroundings … brand new pianos stretch for a while. They go out of tune quicker. The wire stretches and they settle into themselves.”

Some people think they have to let a new, or recently moved older piano, sit six months or a year before it gets tuned. That’s not true, Fry said, but it does need a few weeks.

He recommends that pianos be tuned at least once a year (he tunes his own piano once a year, even though he no longer gives lessons) and the busiest time for him is before the holidays — September through December.

“Piano-tuning is something people can put off,” he said. “We noticed a real drop in tuning when gas got over $3 a gallon. I didn’t think it would make that much of a difference, but it did.”

Fry said he is looking for some kind of work to do in the summertime when his other businesses are slow.

He doesn’t give piano or guitar lessons anymore, but does enjoy tuning all types of pianos.

“It takes me a couple of hours. I have time,” Fry said. “I’m going to do the job that I like to do, and do it right.”

Read the entire article at Keeping pianos, life in tune | Detroit Lakes Online.

Old World Craftsmanship /New World pianos

steinway-brown

Yury Feygin, owner of Amadeus Piano, shows off a Steinway piano on display at his business in Stamford, Conn., on Wednesday, Feb. 4, 2015. The piano company mainly deals with tuning, repairs, moving, storage, restoration and antique piano sales with locations in Westport and Long Island, NY.Photo: Jason Rearick

 

 

Yury Feygin likes playing with pianos — so much, in fact, that he occasionally forgets to eat and sleep.

Like his father, Mikhail, and grandfather, Semyon, Feygin is an expert at restoring, tuning and repairing antique pianos.

Feygin and his workers have built a first-of-its-kind double-decker storage system at their Lenox Avenue warehouse. They have stashed dozens of pianos in the racks, legs removed, filed side-by-side like massive dominos as they await restoration.

“Getting pianos off the ground isn’t a comfortable thing — you’ve got to worry about it falling when you’re handling it, but we have it down to a science,” said Feygin. “People were saying, my dad was saying, `Don’t do this, let me store your stuff.'”

Read more at http://www.stamfordadvocate.com/printpromotion/article/Russian-immigrant-brings-Old-World-craftsmanship-6083020.php

Preserving the Piano during the Holidays and Beyond – Preserving the Piano During the Holidays and Beyond Blog from ArtfixDaily.com

Jim Vogelman, President of JMV Classics, a Florida-based piano design company that specializes in creating unique, custom art case pianos, offers helpful tips on piano maintenance:

Maintaining one’s piano may also help maintain one’s well-being  

Recent studies show that active participation in music learning can preserve a person’s mental and physical health, so whether playing or listening to the piano during the holidays, one can expect to experience the joy of the instrument as well as the joy of the season.

Tuning: The amount of tuning depends on use and environment. We advise that a new or restrung piano may take up to four to six tunings during the first year, but in general, it’s best to have it tuned at least twice a year. A good rule of thumb is to tune when the seasons change. If planning for a professional pianist at a holiday party, be sure the piano is well tuned and in good working order.

Polish: If the piano has been protected using a high gloss finish, dust with a soft, dry cloth, free of chemicals. Use a cloth dipped in mild dish soap and water to clean, but wring the cloth tightly and follow with a dry, soft cloth. For satin finish, dust with a soft, dry chemical-free cloth. Any high quality polish or lemon oil can be used as a wood preserving step, especially if holiday cheer might be spilled during the festivities. For the hand painted finish of an art case piano, we recommend employing a highly skilled, professional art cleaner, as these finishes can be as delicate and important as any fine work of art and as treasured as any museum quality piece.

The Keys: Keep keys dust free, but clean only when necessary, using a moist cloth, then immediately wipe dry. Never spray keys with a commercial cleaner–too much moisture may cause the wood to swell. This season, best to keep children’s sticky fingers or hands heavy with hors d’oeuvres at bay!

Humidity: Humidity is perhaps the single most potentially destructive climate challenge for a piano. Damp chasers only work when the piano lid is closed. For areas where high humidity is a way of life, air conditioning or a dehumidifier in a closed space is always the best solution, especially if used on a regular basis. Once a month, open the piano lid for a few days while the A/C is running to allow for dry air circulation. In dry weather, open the lid and the windows, allowing fresh flowing air to circulate around the piano.

Maintaining one’s piano may also help maintain one’s well-being,” Vogelman says. “Recent studies show that active participation in music learning can preserve a person’s mental and physical health, so whether playing or listening to the piano during the holidays, one can expect to experience the joy of the instrument as well as the joy of the season.”

Read the entire article at Preserving the Piano during the Holidays and Beyond – Preserving the Piano During the Holidays and Beyond Blog from ArtfixDaily.com.